How to Fix Uneven Shoulders

What is Uneven Shoulders?

Uneven shoulders is the asymmetrical position between the left and right shoulder.

The 2 most common presentations:

1. Uneven shoulder heights

“… Why do I have one shoulder higher than the other?”

As viewed from the front/back, there will be an observable:

  • Higher shoulder and a
  • Lower shoulder

2. One shoulder more forward than the other

As viewed from the side, there will be an observable:

  • Forward and/or Retracted shoulder (relative to other side)

What causes Uneven shoulders?

… Your daily postural habits!


Think about it:

  • Do you lift/carry things on one side? (see above 🙂 )
  • Are you involved with a sport/occupation/play an instrument that requires predominantly one hand use?
  • Do you wear your bag over one shoulder?
  • Do you always sleep on the same side?

The posture you decide to place your body in will determine the position of your shoulders.

Over time – if you keep adopting the asymmetrical position of your shoulders, having uneven shoulders will become apart of your default posture.

Note: There are also neurological causes that may also lead to this issue. (not covered in this blog post)


… Want to fix your posture?
Follow me on Facebook!
(I post all my best posture tips there!)

Does it really matter that you’re asymmetrical?

With uneven shoulders, there will always be one side that is loaded more than the other.

This can lead to imbalances in:

  • Muscle size
  • Strength
  • Muscular tension
  • Movement

However…

It is also possible to be completely asymptomatic even when you have uneven shoulders.

In fact – did you know that it is common to have a lower shoulder on your side of dominance?

Having uneven shoulders is not always symptomatic in the short term, but can potentially develop into an issue if not addressed early.

How do you tell if you have Uneven shoulders?

Here are some simple ways to help you determine if you have uneven shoulders.

a) For Shoulder height:

1. Compare collar bones

Instructions:

  • Stand relaxed in front of a mirror.
  • Locate the line of your collar bones.
  • Compare the height.

2. Compare upper trapezius

Instructions:

  • Stand relaxed in front of a mirror.
  • Locate the border of the upper trapezius muscle on either side.
  • Compare the height.

Note: Increased muscle bulk may give a false illusion of a higher shoulder.

3. Compare Scapula

Instructions:

  • Take a photo of your back.
  • Locate landmarks on the scapula: (see above)
    • Inferior angle
    • Medial border
    • Lateral border
    • Spine of scapula
  • By connecting these areas, draw the rough outline of the scapula.
  • Compare the overall height of the scapula.

4. How do your clothes fit?

Does your shirt/bra strap tend to always fall down to one side?

The shirt will tend to drop towards the side of the lower shoulder.

b) For a Forward and/or Retracted shoulder

1. Side profile

Instructions:

  • Take a photo of your left and right side profile.
  • Draw a vertical line down the center of your torso.
  • Does the middle of your shoulder sit in the same place? … Or is one more forward/retracted?

2. Superior view

Instructions:

  • Get someone to take a photo from an angle that is looking down onto your shoulders. (see above)
  • Observe if you have one shoulder that is more forward/retracted than the other.
  • (Similarly – if your uneven shoulders are quite prominent, you could just look down at your shoulders and compare them this way!)

3. Lying down

Instructions:

  • Lie down on the floor.
  • Take a photo from an above head position.
  • Compare shoulder positions.
    • … Is there one side that is more forward?

What muscles are involved?

a) Elevated shoulder:

– Tight/overactive muscles that pull the shoulder UPWARDS:

  • Upper trapezius
  • Levator Scapula

– Weak/inhibited muscles that are not pulling the shoulder DOWNWARDS:

  • Lower trapezius
  • Latissimus dorsi
  • Lower serratus anterior
  • Pec minor/major *
  • Subclavius *

(*especially if shoulder is forward)

b) Depressed shoulder:

– Tight/overactive muscles pulling the shoulder DOWNWARDS:

  • Lower trapezius
  • Latissimus dorsi
  • Lower serratus anterior
  • Pec major/minor
  • Subclavius

– Weak/inhibited muscles that are not pulling the shoulder UPWARDS:

  • Upper trapezius
  • Levator Scapula

c) Forward shoulder:

– Tight/overactive muscles that pull the shoulder FORWARDS:

  • Pec major/minor
  • Subclavius
  • Latissimus dorsi
  • Anterior deltoid
  • Subscapularis
  • Serratus anterior

– Weak muscles that are not pulling the shoulder BACKWARDS:

  • Rhomboids
  • Lower/middle trapezius

d) Retracted shoulder:

– Tight/overactive muscles pulling shoulder BACKWARDS:

  • Rhomboids
  • Lower/middle trapezius

– Weak muscles that are not pulling the shoulder FORWARDS:

  • Serratus Anterior

Exercises to fix Uneven shoulders

1. Address these areas first


It is important that you address the following points BEFORE you commence any exercises.

(Why?… They can give the false illusion of having Uneven shoulders.)


a) Scoliosis

If your spine tends to bend to the side, it can result in uneven shoulders.

Since your spine/rib cage is the foundation of your shoulders, it is important that this area is in a neutral position.

Check out this post: Scoliosis Exercises

b) Rotated torso

If your torso is rotated, it can give the appearance of having one shoulder more forward/retracted than the other.

Here is a quick test:

Instructions:

  • Take a photo from the above head position.
  • Find the line of your pelvis.
  • Fine the line of your torso.
  • If these 2 lines are not parallel, then you have a rotated torso relative to your pelvis.

Example: If your upper torso is rotated to the right, your left shoulder will be orientated in a more forward position.

Note:
I don’t have a blog post on How to Fix a Rotated Torso yet… but make sure you follow me on Facebook so that you’ll know when I do have it!

c) Check your pelvis

If you have Scoliosis or a Rotated torso, it is also a good idea to check if your pelvis is influencing these positions as well.

How to fix a: Rotated pelvis

How to fix a: Lateral pelvic tilt

2. Control your scapula

The position of your shoulder blade will determine the position of your shoulder as a whole.

This is the reason why it is so important to have full control of the movement of your scapula.

(It will help you with the rest of the exercises mentioned in the blog post.)

Scapula rotations (4 point kneel)

Video from: Movement duets

Instructions:

  • Assume the 4 point kneel position. (see above)
  • Lock your elbows straight.
  • Perform shoulder circles:
    • Shrug your shoulders up towards your ears.
    • Squeeze the shoulders blades up and back.
    • Retract the shoulders back.
    • Squeeze the shoulder blade back and down.
    • Relax.
  • Repeat 10 times
  • Change directions.
  • The goal is to produce and control as much movement in your shoulder blade as possible.

3. Determine your shoulder position

It is important to understand how your shoulder has deviated from the neutral position.

This will dictate WHICH exercises you should be performing to bring it back to neutral.

(… we need to be careful not to do the wrong exercises!)


The ideal shoulder position:

In order to determine your shoulder position, we first need to understand what the ideal shoulder position is.

(Note: There is a degree of variability of this “ideal” position and will certainly differ in different people Use it as a rough guide line!)

a) Back view

Rough guideline

  • Top of scapula:
    • T2
  • Spine of the scapula:
    • T4
  • Bottom of scapula (Inferior angle):
    • T7-9
  • Ideal resting position of the scapula:
    • Sits flat on the rib cage
    • Slightly angled outwards (orange line)
  • The position of the scapula on the left and right side should generally be even.

Interpretation:


  • If your scapula sits higher that this position, then you have an ELEVATED shoulder.
  • If your scapula sits lower than this position, you have a DEPRESSED shoulder.

b) Front view

The angle of the collar bone (clavicle) should have a slight upward angle. (see above)


Interpretation:


  • If the clavicle is significantly upward slanted, then you have an ELEVATED shoulder.
  • If the clavicle angle is flat or sloping downwards, then you have a DEPRESSED shoulder.

Note: Thoracic Kyphosis may affect these results!


 c) Side view

The middle of the shoulder should approximately be in line with the mid line of the body.

Interpretation:


  • If your shoulder sits in front of the line, then you have a FORWARD shoulder.
  • If your shoulder sits behind the line, then you have a RETRACTED shoulder.

⚠  Don’t get confused!…  ⚠

Your higher shoulder does NOT necessarily mean that you have an ELEVATED shoulder.

With uneven shoulders, it is possible to have 2 DEPRESSED shoulders, but one side may be relatively higher.

In this case – you would do the same exercises (for a depressed shoulder) for both sides, but may need to focus more attention on the side that is lower.

It is the same for both shoulders that are forward. One side might just be a little bit more forward.


4. Exercises for Uneven shoulders


Note:

You may or may not need to do exercises for both of your shoulders.

Address the side(s) where the shoulder has moved away from the neutral position.


a) Elevated shoulder

1. Releases


Releases will help reduce the over-activity of the main muscles that elevate the shoulder.


Instructions:

  • Locate the target muscles:
  • Place a massage ball between this muscle and a wall. (see above)
  • Apply an appropriate amount of pressure into the ball.
  • Make sure to cover the entire muscle.
  • Continue for 1 minute.

2. Stretches


Stretches will reduce the over-activity and tightness of the muscles the pull the shoulder upwards.


a) Upper trapezius

Instructions:

  • Pull your elevated shoulder down.
    • You can hold onto something to help anchor your shoulder.
  • Tilt your head away from the high shoulder.
  • Using your hand, pull your head further into the tilt.
  • Aim to feel a stretch in the region between the head and shoulder.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.

b) Levator scapula

Instructions:

  • Pull your elevated shoulder down.
  • Look towards the armpit that is on the opposite side.
  • Place your hand on the back of your head and apply a downward pressure towards the armpit direction.
  • Aim to feel a stretch between the top the of the scapula and your head.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.

3. Strengthening exercises


It is important that we strengthen the muscles that pull the shoulder downwards.


Scapular DEPRESSION:


  • Pull the shoulder blade DOWN.
    • “Pull your shoulder blade into your back pocket”
  • Aim to FEEL the muscles contract at the base of the scapula.
  • This motion will be used in all of the following exercises.

a) End range flexion

Instructions

  • Place the hand on the side of the elevated shoulder high up on a wall in front of you.
  • Lean firmly into this hand.
  • Perform Scapular Depression:
    • “Pull your shoulder down.”
  • Hold for 30 seconds.
  • Aim to feel the muscular contraction around the lower region of your shoulder blade.
  • Repeat 5 times.

b) Scapula push ups hold

Instructions:

  • Sit on the floor with your legs out stretched.
  • Place the hand that is on the side of the elevated shoulder onto a yoga block.
  • Lock your arms straight.
  • Lean your body weight into your hands.
    • Your shoulder should naturally hitch upwards as you do this.
  • Perform Scapula Depression:
    • Pull your shoulders down as you lean more weight onto the hand.
    • “Create distance between your ear and shoulder.”
  • Aim to feel the muscular contraction around the lower region of your shoulder blade.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.
  • Repeat 5 times
  • Note: If you find this difficult, you can perform the same exercise whilst sitting on a chair with your feet on the ground. (= less weight on your hands)

c) Prone arm lift

Instructions

  • Lie down on your stomach.
  • Reach your hands out in front of you.
  • Lift the arm on side of the elevated shoulder.
  • Perform Scapula Depression as you lift your arm:
    • “Pull your shoulder blade down”
  • Hold for 20-30 seconds.
  • Repeat 5 times.

4. Taping

Taping your elevated shoulder in a downwards direction will help keep the shoulder in a better position.

tapesh

Instructions:

  • Gently pull your elevated shoulder down into a neutral position.
    • (Scapular Depression)
  • Place the tape starting from above collar bone and pull back and down to the middle of your thoracic spine. (as above)
  • Make sure you place firm downward pressure when applying the tape.
  • Depending on your skin irritability, you can leave the tape on for up to ~2 days.

b) Depressed shoulder

1. Releases


Releases will reduce the over-activity of the muscles that pull the shoulder downwards.


Instructions

  • Locate the muscles that pull the shoulder downwards:
  • Whilst lying down, place a massage ball or foam roller directly under these muscles.
  • Apply an appropriate amount of body weight onto the ball.
    • If it’s tight…. it’s going to be tender!
  • Roll your body in an up/down motion.
  • Do NOT hold your breath.
    • Ease off the pressure if you are tensing up.
  • Make sure you cover the entire muscle.
  • Duration: 1-2 minutes per muscle group.

2. Stretches


Stretches will reduce the tightness of the muscles that pull the shoulder downwards.


a) Latissimus Dorsi

Instructions:

  • Assume the position as seen above.
  • Whilst holding onto the door frame, let your upper arm (side of the depressed shoulder) take the weight of your body.
    • “Let your body hang”
  • Whilst anchoring your legs as shown, aim to bend your mid section as much as possible.
    • Use your body weight to sink into the stretch
  • Aim to feel a stretch on the side of your torso.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.

b) Chest stretch

Instructions:

  • Place the hand on the side of your depressed shoulder onto a door frame. (see above)
    • Keep your hand up high.
  • Lunge forward.
  • Shrug your shoulder upwards.
  • Do not arch your lower back.
    • Keep the lower rib cage down.
  • Aim to feel a stretch in the front part of your shoulder/chest region.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.

c) Lower trapezius

Instructions:

  • Sit down on a chair.
  • Slouch your upper back as much as you can.
    • Focus at bending your spine at the level of the lower shoulder blade.
  • Shrug the shoulder upwards on the side of the depressed shoulder.
  • Try to take a deep breath into the middle of your back.
  • Aim to feel a stretch in the region around the lower shoulder blade.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.

d) Serratus anterior

Instructions:

  • Assume the position as above with the depressed shoulder towards the floor.
  • Lean your upper body weight onto your forearm.
    • Your shoulder should naturally hitch upwards.
  • Whilst keeping your waist pinned down to the ground, push your torso up right.
  • Aim to feel a stretch on the side of your rib cage.
  • Take a deep breath into the area where you feel the stretch.
  • Hold for 30 seconds

3. Strengthening


Strengthen the muscles that elevate the shoulder.


Before you get into the strengthening exercises, you will need to learn how to perform:

Scapula ELEVATION

Instructions:

  • “Shrug your shoulders towards your ears.”
  • Aim to feel the contraction of the upper trapezius.

a) Shrugs

Instructions:

  • Hold onto a weight onto the side of your depressed shoulder.
  • You can have your arms:
    • By your side or
    • Above your head
  • Keep your elbows straight.
  • Perform Shoulder Elevation.
  • Feel the contraction of the upper trapezius.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.
  • Repeat 3 times.
  • Progression: Hold onto a heavier weight.

c) Forward shoulder

Note: I have written a comprehensive blog post to fix a forward shoulder.


Check out the post: How to fix Rounded shoulders.

1. Releases

a) Front of shoulder

Instructions:

  • Locate the targets areas:
  • Whilst lying on the floor, place a massage ball directly under these muscles.
  • Apply an appropriate amount of body weight onto the ball.
    • (If it’s tight…. it’s going to be tender!)
  • Perform a gentle circular motion over these areas.
  • Do NOT hold your breath.
    • Ease off the pressure if you are tensing up.
  • Make sure you cover the entire muscle.
  • Duration: 1-2 minutes per muscle.

b) Side of torso

Instructions:

  • Locate the targets areas:
  • Whilst lying on the floor, place the foam roller directly under these muscles.
  • Apply an appropriate amount of body weight onto the ball.
  • Roll your body in an up/down motion
  • Do NOT hold your breath.
  • Make sure you cover the entire muscle.
  • Duration: 1-2 minutes per muscle.

2. Stretches:

a) Chest stretch

Instructions:

  • Place the hand that is on the side of the forward shoulder on the door frame. (see above)
  • Lunge forward.
  • Pull your shoulder back.
  • Do not arch your lower back.
    • Keep your lower rib cage down.
  • Aim to feel a stretch in the front part of your shoulder/chest region.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.

b) Lateral (side) stretch

Instructions:

  • Assume the position above.
    • The upper arm should be the side of the forward shoulder.
  • Whilst holding onto the door frame, let your upper arm take the weight of your body.
    • “Let your body hang”
  • Whilst anchoring your legs as shown, aim to bend your mid section as much as possible.
    • Use your body weight to sink into the stretch
  • Aim to feel a stretch on the side of your torso.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.

c) Front shoulder stretch

Front shoulder stretch

Instructions:

  • With both hands on a chair, let your body sink down as low as possible. (see above)
  • Keep your shoulder blades squeezed together.
  • Keep your elbows in. Don’t let them flare out.
  • Do not let your shoulder to protract forwards.
  • Aim to feel a stretch at the front of your shoulders.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.

3. Strengthening

Before you get into the strengthening exercises, you will need to learn how to perform Scapula RETRACTION.


Instructions:

  • Maintain wide and long shoulders.
  • Perform Scapular Retraction.
    • “Pull your shoulder blades together”
  • FEEL the contraction between the shoulder blades.

a) Elbows flares

exercises for rounded shoulders

Instructions:

  • Place the hand on the same side of the forward shoulder on the side of your head. (see Start position)
    • Keep elbow pointing forwards.
  • Bring your elbow all the way back. (see End position)
    • Perform Scapula Retraction whilst pulling elbows backwards.
  • Feel the contraction of the muscles between the shoulder blade and spine.
  • Hold for 5 seconds.
  • Repeat 20 times.

b) Arm lift off wall

Instructions:

  • Place an out stretched hand onto a wall.
    • Arm should be raise to 90 degrees.
  • Rotate your torso away from the wall.
  • Perform Scapula Retraction as you lift your hand off the wall.
  • Make sure to keep your arm straight.
  • Repeat 20 times.

c) Elbow lift

Instructions:

  • Lie face down on the floor.
  • Place your hand behind your head.
    • This should be on the side of your forward shoulder.
  • Whilst keeping your hand at the back of your head, lift up your elbow as high as you can.
  • You will need to perform Scapula retraction to achieve this movement.
    • Feel the contraction between your shoulder blades.
  • Hold for 5 seconds.
  • Repeat 20 times.

4. Taping

Instructions:

  • Perform a slight Scapula Retraction
    • “Pull your shoulder blades backwards”
  • Anchor a tape from the front of your shoulder to the middle of your torso. (See above: Green tape)

d) Retracted shoulder


This uneven shoulder position usually occurs in people who are either:

  • excessively contracting the muscles between the shoulder blade in the attempt to correct their shoulder position (“military posture”) or
  • people who are compensating for deviations in the spine (eg. rotated torso).

If you have an overly retracted shoulder (and your torso is in a neutral position), you will need to focus on relaxing the muscles between the shoulder blades.

This is to allow the shoulder to assume a more neutral position.


1. Releases

a) Inter-scapular releaseshoudler blade ball

Instructions:

  • Locate the region between your shoulder blade and spine.
  • Whilst lying down on the floor, place this area on top of a massage ball.
  • Apply an appropriate amount of your body weight on top of the ball.
  • Cover the entire region.
  • To increase the release, move your arm in a up/down motion. (see above)
  • Continue for 1-3 minutes.

2. Stretches

a) Inter-scapular stretch

Instructions:

  • Wrap your arms around the mid-section of a large exercise ball.
    • Try to get your fingers to touch.
  • Hunch your upper back as much as possible as you push your hands away from you.
    • Allow the shoulder blades to spread across your back.
    • If you are targeting only one shoulder, make sure you emphasize the stretch on that side.
  • Look down.
  • Aim to feel a stretch in the area between your shoulder blades.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.
  • Repeat 2 times.

3. Relax your muscles

With excessively retracted shoulders, you are likely gripping or over tensing those muscles that pull the shoulder blades backwards.

Let’s learn to relax these muscles:

  1. Locate the exact area between the retracted shoulder blade and the spine.
  2. Bring awareness of the tension in this area.
  3. Visualize this area starting to soften and relax.
  4. Visualize lengthening between the space between the shoulder blade and spine.
  5. See if you can take a deep breath into this region.
  6. Hold for 5 seconds.
  7. Repeat 5 times.
  8. Keep your shoulders long and wide.

4. Strengthening

Before you get into the strengthening exercises, you will need to learn how to perform Scapula PROTRACTION.


Instructions:

  • Assume the wall plank position.
  • Perform Scapula Protraction:
    • Pull your shoulder blades DOWN and AROUND the ribs.
  • Keep your shoulders long/wide.
  • Push your forearms into the wall.
  • Aim to feel the contraction in the lower and side region of the scapula.

a) Push up plus

Instructions:

  • Assume the plank position on the wall. (see above)
  • Perform Scapula Protraction:
    • Push your forearms into the wall.
      • “Elongate your elbows towards the wall.”
    • Think of your shoulder blades gliding around side the sides of your rib cage.
  • Hold this end position for 20 seconds.
  • Make sure you can feel the muscular contraction in sides of your ribs throughout the exercise.
  • Retract shoulder blades back to the starting neutral position
  • Repeat 5 times.

5. Combined positions

“Mark, I have an elevated AND a forward shoulder… what do I do?”

To begin with, I would still recommend doing all of the releases and stretches as indicated.

However- you will need to be a bit more specific in which muscles that you should be targeting.


From here – you basically have 2 options:

  • 1. Do every single exercise for the said shoulder positions.
  • 2. Combine shoulder movements into the 1 exercise. (…this will save you some time!)

Possible combinations:

  • Elevated + Forward shoulder
  • Elevated + Retracted shoulder
  • Depressed  + Forward shoulder
  • Depressed + Retracted shoulder

a) Elevated and Forward

Wall press and squeeze

wall squeeze

Instructions:

  • Place your hand (on side of the shoulder than you are targeting) as high up on a wall in front of you.
  • Lean firmly into your hands.
  • Perform Scapula Retraction/Depression.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.
  • Aim to feel the muscular contraction between your shoulder blades.
  • Repeat 5 times.

b) Depressed and Forward

4 point kneel wall push

Instructions:

  • Assume the 4 point kneel position.
  • Lift and reach out a straightened arm in front of you so that your hand is pushing and holding a ball against the wall. (see above) 
    • Try to be as far away from the wall as possible.
  • Perform Scapula Elevation and Retraction as you press the ball into the wall.
  • Roll the ball in a circular motion.
  • Keep your neck relaxed.
  • Repeat 30 times.
  • Do counter and counter-clockwise.

c) Retracted and Depressed

Shrugs with relaxation

Instructions:

  • Relax the muscles between your shoulder blade.
    • Keep your shoulders light.
  • Perform Scapula Elevation.
    • Shrug your shoulders up towards your ears.
    • Hold this position for 10 seconds.
    • Aim to feel a contraction in the upper trapezius.
    • Relax
  • Repeat 10 times.

d) Retracted + Elevated

Plank

Instructions:

  • Assume the wall plank position.
  • Perform Scapular Depression:
    • “Pull your shoulder blade downwards”
    • Aim to feel the muscle contraction between your shoulder blades.
  • Perform Scapular Protraction:
    • Whilst pulling the shoulder blades downwards, push your forearms into the floor as to move your shoulder blades around your rib cage.
    • Aim to feel the muscle contraction on the side of you ribs.
  • Hold for 30 seconds.
  • Repeat 2 times.

6. Maintaining neutral shoulder

Now that you have:

  • Released and Stretched out the tight muscles holding you in the uneven shoulder position and,
  • Strengthened the muscles that bring the shoulder into a more neutral position

… the next step (and probably the most important!) is to activate the appropriate muscles (… the ones you targeted with the strengthening exercises) to maintain the correct shoulder position throughout your daily life.


Quick tip:

In the early stages of correcting your uneven shoulders, aim to correct your shoulder position to an amount that you are comfortable with.

(You do NOT need to correct it 100% straight away.)

As your body becomes accustomed to this position, slowly increase the % of correction.


7. Address activities causing your Uneven shoulders

If you do all of the mentioned exercises in this blog post, but then spend most of your time in the position/activity that has lead to your Uneven shoulders in the first place… it is likely that your progress will be significantly hindered!

You will need to either:

  • Improve your posture in this position/activity,
  • Reduce exposure to the position or
  • Eliminate doing it completely!

8. Other positions leading to Uneven shoulders:

There are many different positions that the shoulder complex can adopt which could give the appearance of uneven shoulders.

I have addressed the 2 main issues (uneven shoulder heights, one shoulder more forward/retracted), but here are others that you might need to consider.

a) Winged scapula

winged scapula

A Winged Scapula is when the inner border of the shoulder blade protrudes off the rib cage.

This can lead to the appearance of having Uneven shoulders.

 I have written an entire blog post which completely addresses this issue.

Check out the postHow to fix your Winged scapula.

b) Scapula downward vs upward rotation

c) Scapula anterior vs posterior tilt

d) Lateral glide vs medial glide


Note: I will produce a blog post on the remaining shoulder positions in the future. In the meanwhile, feel free to ask me any questions in the comments section.


Conclusion

  • Uneven shoulders is the asymmetrical position of the shoulders.
  • It can result in imbalanced loads on the shoulders which may eventually lead to all kinds of issues.
  • Before correcting your uneven shoulders, any rotation and/or tilting of the torso must be addressed.
  • If the shoulders remain uneven after the torso is aligned, then focus on the exercises that are appropriate to your specific presentation.
  • Make sure that you address any activities/positions that are encouraging your uneven shoulders.

What to do next…

1. Any questions?… (Leave me a comment down below.)

2. Come join me on the Facebook page. Let’s keep in touch!

3. Start doing the exercises!

About

I am a physiotherapist who has personally experienced the pain as a result of bad posture. I would like to offer you some of the solutions that I and my patients have greatly benefited from.

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